lazy

I thought about doing a book review this week–I have both the crafter’s guide to taking great photos and crafting by concepts, but the first belongs to me and the second isn’t due back to the library for five weeks, so I’m not in any hurry. I also thought about maybe writing something of a musing about the nature of art and how I feel about my textiles; especially given that most of my art background is actually in drawing and visual arts, and how do textiles fit into that framework? We’ve been talking a lot about that in class lately.

But ultimately, I have almost made it through my first two weeks of college now, and frankly I am tired. It’s going to be something of a lazy weekend (I get Mondays off before fall quarter starts) so you don’t get a review or deep ponderings on art. You get more fish.

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These are all the pieces for my rockfish minus the body. From top to bottom, left to right, we have soft dorsal fin, lips, bony dorsal fin, anal fin, fish eyes, paired pelvic fins, and paired pectoral fins.

(Thinking about redoing the bony dorsal, but haven’t decided if I’m finicky enough about the color to make changing colors in a fdc row worth it.)

Anyways, that’s a lot of different kinds of fins, huh? Especially when the highly distilled popular culture image of a fish (think goldfish crackers) basically only has the caudal and the pectoral fins. But if you hang out with enough fish, you get to know them pretty well.

Dorsal fins go on the back and prevent a fish from rolling over and aid in navigation. Most fish have one; rockfish have two, the first of which is armed with nail-like spikes. Some species can also inject poison through these spines. Charming!

The anal fin is similar to the dorsal fins, but it goes on the underside, usually after where the actual anus is. It acts as a stabilizer.

Pelvic fins don’t look at all like they are attached to a pelvis, and strictly speaking they’re not. However, they are analogous to hind limbs on vertebrates that have legs. They help in sharp turns, up and down, and quick stops.

Pectoral fins are generalized structures that are often highly adapted to particular functions. In rockfish they are probably used to help navigate, but in flying gurnards they function as an intimidation device and make gurnards impossible to swallow whole, and in sea robins they have been adopted into creepy spider-leg things.

The caudal fin does propulsion. It’s not in my aggregate image of yarn rockfish parts because I designed it to be crocheted along with the body instead of separately. They can be quite fancy in some species–for instance the domestic (and artificially selected) butterfly-tail goldfish and betta–or lethal, in the case of the thresher shark.

Adipose fins don’t exist on rockfish. What are they?

we just dont know gif

(No, really–we have no idea what they’re for, which is a problem, because we regularly cut it off as a method to mark fishery-raised salmon.)

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